50 Portraits – 28/29

Exposure: 1/30 sec – Aperture: f1.8 – ISO: 100 – Focal Length: 28mm
Lens: EF 28mm f/1.8 USM – Camera: Canon 5D

Exposure: 1/20 sec – Aperture: f1.8 – ISO: 100 – Focal Length: 28mm
Lens: EF 28mm f/1.8 USM – Camera: Canon 5D

Exposure: 1/80 sec – Aperture: f1.8 – ISO: 400 – Focal Length: 28mm
Lens: EF 28mm f/1.8 USM – Camera: Canon 5D

Exposure: 1/500 sec – Aperture: f1.8 – ISO: 400 – Focal Length: 28mm
Lens: EF 28mm f/1.8 USM – Camera: Canon 5D

Exposure: 1/400 sec – Aperture: f1.8 – ISO: 400 – Focal Length: 28mm
Lens: EF 28mm f/1.8 USM – Camera: Canon 5D

Exposure: 1/500 sec – Aperture: f1.8 – ISO: 400 – Focal Length: 28mm
Lens: EF 28mm f/1.8 USM – Camera: Canon 5D

Exposure: 1/500 sec – Aperture: f1.8 – ISO: 400 – Focal Length: 28mm
Lens: EF 28mm f/1.8 USM – Camera: Canon 5D

Exposure: 1/320 sec – Aperture: f1.8 – ISO: 400 – Focal Length: 28mm
Lens: EF 28mm f/1.8 USM – Camera: Canon 5D

Exposure: 1/250 sec – Aperture: f1.8 – ISO: 400 – Focal Length: 28mm
Lens: EF 28mm f/1.8 USM – Camera: Canon 5D

Exposure: 1/200 sec – Aperture: f1.8 – ISO: 400 – Focal Length: 28mm
Lens: EF 28mm f/1.8 USM – Camera: Canon 5D

Exposure: 1/400 sec – Aperture: f1.8 – ISO: 400 – Focal Length: 28mm
Lens: EF 28mm f/1.8 USM – Camera: Canon 5D

Exposure: 1/200 sec – Aperture: f1.8 – ISO: 400 – Focal Length: 28mm
Lens: EF 28mm f/1.8 USM – Camera: Canon 5D

Exposure: 1/200 sec – Aperture: f1.8 – ISO: 400 – Focal Length: 28mm
Lens: EF 28mm f/1.8 USM – Camera: Canon 5D

Exposure: 1/100 sec – Aperture: f1.8 – ISO: 500 – Focal Length: 28mm
Lens: EF 28mm f/1.8 USM – Camera: Canon 5D

Exposure: 1/125 sec – Aperture: f1.8 – ISO: 500 – Focal Length: 28mm
Lens: EF 28mm f/1.8 USM – Camera: Canon 5D

| currently listening to: Van Halen, Nerf Herder, s/t, 1996 | LINK

the photography:

Portrait #28 is Joel | Portrait #29 is Elizabeth

kickball shall bring-ith us together-ith. that’s pretty much the mantra that i followed for a while back in 2007. that’s when i met joel. it’s also how i subsequently met elizabeth but i don’t really remember it that well. either way, they were both kind enough to tag along for some logan square photography complete with a 2 block radius sweep of the CTA blueline stop.

joel is a kindred soul. i knew this already but after further discussion, we realized that we each have significant ties to the upper peninsula of michigan and that we both enjoy the same humor and intellectual stimuli. amazingly, we have lived with the same roommate albeit in two different parts of the country and at least 5 years in between the two apartments. funny how life works like that? friends bring friends together in the oddest of ways.

and that is also how i met elizabeth. she’s from the same suburban chicago-land town as joel but they were enough apart in years to not know each other from school. it’s all about how you use your six degrees. the reason i asked joel to be a part of this project was because he is a reader of the blog and he owns this fantastic leather jacket. i told him to bring it with him. elizabeth noticed that joel was being photographed and wanted in. my philosophy? the more the merrier. and she was smashing. it helps when your subjects are comfortable with each other. awkward moments caught on film? we save that for facebook. they do make a pretty pair, don’t they?!

photos again are with the 28mm f1.8. it just makes things right in the world. i’m gonna get the 50mm fixed, someday. numerical order = chronological order = story telling w/out editing.

the music:
i started a thread on twitter the other day that centered around nerf herder lyrics. my friend dixie picked up on it quickly and we have been going strong for a few days now. it’s been cracking me up the entire time. who knew that some fleeting frat-punk band could last the years and make some inspiring songs for the world to hunger over? the song van halen was my introduction to nerf herder. pantera fans in love is where i pee my pants. “i bought van halen I it was the best damn record i ever owned…”

9 thoughts on “50 Portraits – 28/29

  1. Bones

    Maybe it’s just me, but I think I dig the 28mm more than the 50mm. Better scope for “Street” portraiture and with the f1.8, it’s still faster and sexier than a clerk working the returns counter at Nordstrom.

  2. Jess

    Is this the Ian Merritt from VT? I think I heard from Edie B that you lived here. Small town – I saw your pics on Facebook (I went to high school with Elizabeth) and your name caught my eye. Just a friendly Chi town hello…. Your pics look great.
    – Jess

  3. dt

    I have no idea how much longer we can keep this up, but I love it, we may have lost our hairlines, but at least we haven’t lost our cool, buddy

  4. Steve

    Well done Ian; love the shots on FF. The beautiful soft background blurring in your pix just convinced me to pickup the 28 1.8 πŸ™‚

  5. ian Post author

    Thanks Steve, it’s been my go to lens for a while now. It’s small and compact on the camera so I can take more discrete photos with my 5D. great for traveling.

  6. Andrew

    Hi,

    Actually, I have some questions if that’s ok? The second shot doesn’t seem to be in focus, is it just that this lens is soft at 1.8, or are you maybe focused on some point other than the models face? Its hard to tell, but maybe his jacket looks in focus?

    Also, te bokeh from these street shots is very distracting, the OOF sections are very busy, is this typical of what you get with this lens, or was if just a bad day?

    Thanks

    A

  7. ian Post author

    Hey Andrew!
    The second photo is in focus but that focus is not on the subject’s face. At f1.8, all lens’ create a very thin z-plane (x being vertical, y being horizontal, and z being your third dimension or depth) on which to focus. For example, when focusing on a subject’s face at f1.8 you can focus on the middle of the nose and have the tip of the nose and the cheeks behind the nose drop out of focus quite quickly (depending how close you are to the subject). With the 28mm lens, the z-plane of focus is actually bowed slightly as there is a curved distortion that happens at that wide a lens so that the z-plane is not actually perpendicular to the lens the further you get away from center of the image. Does that make sense?

    As far as the bokeh is concerned, the lens has very little to do with the background. The distraction you see stems from the background itself as the city streets of Chicago are quite busy. I tend to dodge and burn some of my backgrounds in photoshop to make them pop or disappear. This time I burned them slightly to make them distinct. Bokeh is defined not only by the quality of the glass but also by the length of lens. If you are looking for the most smooth bokeh, I suggest using a long zoom and if you are looking for the busiest or chunkiest bokeh, wide angle lens should suffice. A lot of it is in the physics of lens’.

    I hope that helps you out!

    And remember, if you are using this lens on a camera with a field of view crop factor (non-fullframe) you will get different results as the physics of the lens length will change according to the x# attached with your camera.

    Cheers,
    -Ian

  8. Nathaniel

    I’m a little late to the party here, but I stumbled upon this post with a Google image search while seeking out pictures shot with this lens. I’m definitely sold on it now. I have the 50mm 1.4 and love it to death; but quite often it’s just a little too telephoto, so I always have to keep my 18-135mm handy. I’d love to wander around with just a 28 and a 50 πŸ™‚

    Thanks for sharing!

  9. Kris

    Hi,

    Exactly same for me as for Nathaniel : came here after a Google image search while seeking out pictures shot with this lens. I have a 50mm 1.4 and love it but quite often it’s just not wide enough sometimes. I’m convinced now.
    And thanks for sharing!

    πŸ™‚

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